Restorationism brings traditionalist approaches to parish life

(NCR Online) Within church circles, restorationism, a movement to “renew the renewal” of Vatican II by bringing traditionalist approaches to liturgy and governance of parish life, is often denied and frequently argued about.

It might be akin to how a Supreme Court Justice famously viewed pornography: hard to define, but you know it when you see it.

In parishes across the country, young pastors, raised in a post-Vatican II world, are incorporating costumes, vestments, music and other elements that have their roots in practices preceding 1965.

For some, including Pope Francis, one of its most acerbic critics, the movement is rife with clericalism, asserting priestly powers in parishes where laypeople had grown accustomed to participation in ministries and governance. The pope has railed against a resurgent clericalism, in one case telling a group of religious formation directors about “little monsters” who use ordination to lord it over others.

Benedictine Fr. Anthony Ruff, associate professor of theology at St. John’s University in Collegeville, Minn., told NCR that restorationism is a reaction to growing secularization and rapid social change, such as the widespread acceptance of same-sex marriage and declines in Mass attendance.

“There is fear of a rapidly changing world. I think it is driving people to bad solutions,” he said. [More]

SOURCE

NCR Online