Spencer Tracy, Hollywood priest

Screen legend Spencer Tracy (1900-1967), who won one of his two Academy Awards for portraying a priest during Hollywood’s golden age, played Catholic clergymen three other times, but was never comfortable with it, reveals a forthcoming book about the star.

In “Spencer Tracy: A Biography,” to be published this fall by Alfred A. Knopf, James Curtis writes that MGM director W.S. “Woody” Van Dyke had to talk Tracy into taking the role of Father Tim Mullin, the pugilistic childhood friend of Clark Gable’s character Blackie Norton, in the 1936 film “San Francisco.” Before then, clerical roles in films had always been assigned to character players, not leading men.

“If he had any fear,” Curtis writes, “it was the fear of artificiality, the fear that lifelong Catholics would look at Father Tim and see a movie star pretending to be a priest and not the soul of a real priest.” As it turned out, Tracy’s portrayal was so convincing, his fan mail began to include requests for spiritual advice, leading him to reflect to his secretary, “You can’t live up to an idealistic role.”

Tracy, a lifelong Catholic whose boyhood parish was St. Rose of Lima in Milwaukee, played a priest for the last time as Father Matthew Doonan, rescuing children from a doomed hospital in 1961’s “The Devil at 4 O’Clock.” But he’s best remembered for two portrayals of a real-life cleric, Father Edward J. Flanagan (1886-1948), in 1938’s “Boys Town” and its 1941 sequel, “Men of Boys Town” – winning an Oscar for the first film.

It took another Catholic – Eddie Mannix, production manager at MGM – to persuade Tracy to take the part of Father Flanagan. “Your name is written in gold in the heart of every homeless boy in Boys Town,” Father Flanagan eventually wrote Tracy from the Omaha, Neb., headquarters of the charity he had founded in 1917, “because of the anticipated picture you are going to make for us.” [more]

SOURCE

The Catholic Review